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Some of the world’s leading clinicians and researchers from the field of complex trauma are to come together to discuss pioneering new research and potential interventions at a forthcoming interactive event.

Professor Thanos Karatzias from Edinburgh Napier University, Professor Lisa De La Rue from the University of San Francisco, Dr Neil Roberts Consultant Clinical Psychologist from the Cardiff and Vale University Health Board, Dr Sofie Folke, Clinical Psychologist from Denmark and Dr Leonhard Kratzer, Clinical Psychologist from Germany lead the expert line-up at the 2nd International Trauma Informed Care Conference.

They will be joined by Dr Emily Fox Director of Society for Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT) UK, Dr Paula Cullin and Dr Annette Greenwood, who is Chair of the Crisis, Disaster and Trauma (CDT) section of British Psychological Society (BPS).

Together they will discuss working with core symptoms, physical health needs and the best way to treat trauma alongside comorbidities during the online event entitled ‘Interventions to reduce core and comorbid trauma symptoms’. It will take place on Tuesday, November 9, 2021 between 9am and 5pm.

The conference is being hosted by The Centre for Developmental and Complex Trauma at St Andrew’s Healthcare (STAH) and The Academic Centre, in partnership with the British Psychological Society Crisis, Disaster and Trauma and Psychology Section.

Dr Deborah Morris, Consultant Clinical and Research Psychologist who leads the Centre for Developmental and Complex Trauma, said: “The lifetime impact of trauma can be devastating for people if they do not seek and receive the right help. Often people are unaware of the extent of the impact of trauma, especially the impact on their physical health. Clinicians need training in recognising signs early, and the extent of the impact of trauma so we can put interventions in place.

“We believe services urgently need to adopt more holistic approaches to trauma informed care. As our knowledge of the sequela of trauma grows, including the impact on support systems, so does the need to develop services that can meet the wide ranging care needs of those who have been exposed to trauma? It is also vitally important that services meet the needs of this diverse population and ensure that its treatments need the needs of all populations.

“We’ve thrilled to have such a wide range of global trauma experts presenting at our event who will be able to share their first-hand experience, innovative clinical approaches and any recommendations they may for colleagues when it comes to working within the field of psychological trauma.

Dr Greenwood, who is the Trauma Response Service Lead at STAH, added: “Research has shown that exposure to traumatic events can impact the neural system’s ability, preventing it from returning to normal.

“For this reason, people who have experienced complex trauma may display symptoms including poor concentration, poor attention and poor decision-making and judgement. They may also appear highly reactive and respond to threat even if it is not present. Their behaviour may be aggressive in response, or they may take flight or simply freeze.

“As healthcare professionals we must become better at recognising the signs and putting in interventions early. We need to ensure patients are provided with practical techniques to help build their emotional stability and it can also be useful to explain the neurobiology of trauma which can improve people’s understanding of why they have such intense reactions to everyday experiences which don’t affect others in the same way.

“Exposure to traumatic events can impact the neural system’s ability, preventing it from returning to normal. For this reason, people who have experienced complex trauma may display symptoms including poor concentration, poor attention and poor decision-making and judgement. They may also appear highly reactive and respond to threat even if it is not present. Their behaviour may be aggressive in response, or they may take flight or simply freeze.”

A series of oral papers and posters accompanied with audio summaries exploring clinical approaches in the management of core symptoms of trauma will be presented at the conference. There will also be interactive polls throughout the day and an invited panel discussion will be held.

Prices for tickets for the event start from £25 and are available here.

Full line up:

Working with core symptoms of trauma

Professor Thanos Karatzias, University of Napier

Dr Emily Fox, Director of Society for DBT UK

Dr Kate Lucre, Compassion Focused Therapy Consultant

 

Working with comorbidities

Dr Philip Hyland Associate Professor, Maynooth University

Dr Neil Roberts, Consultant Clinical Psychologist

Dr Paula Collin Consultant Clinical Psychologist

 

Physical health, needs and trauma

Dr Sally Jowett, Clinical Psychologist

Dr Sofie Folke Clinical Psychologist, Denmark

Dr Leonhard Kratzer Clinical Psychologist, Germany

 

Round table and panel discussion: Developing inclusive practice in trauma

Professor Lisa De La Rue, Assistant Professor, University of San Francisco

Dr Annette Greenwood Chair CDT section, BPS Trauma Response Service Lead

Mr David Gibbs Trainer & Consultant